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Archive for the ‘Install’ Category

Download Korean Font

Korean is written using Hangul and a limited number of Han Ideographs. Hangul is an alphabetic/syllabic script made up of components called “jamos”. These jamo conjoin into syllable blocks. Han Ideographs are called Hanja in Korea. A limited set of Hanja is used for Korean with most words being written with Hangul. Some Hanja are visually different in North & South Korea than they are in other countries.

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View And Type Hangul

The first thing to do is to set up your computer to view Hangul, the Korean alphabet.

View Hangul

If your operating system is not listed, do not worry. There are only two cases: those that have the files pre-installed, and those that do not. Generally, the newer operating systems will have them installed, while older ones will not. If you are unsure, I recommend following the instructions for Windows XP. If this does not work, follow the other set of instructions. One of the two will get you set up and running 🙂

Oh, and be sure to check out the following two links if they sound interesting!

Microsoft Instructions Including Images of Each Step
Different Korean Font Downloads – Spice Up Your Text

Type Hangul

Windows XP
Windows 95, 98, 2000

Windows XP

Once you have set-up your computer to view Hangul, you need to do one more thing in order to type Hangul. It should take approximately 2 minutes.
1)Go to Start – Control Panel
2)Open Regional And Language Options (May be found inside the Date, Time, Language, and Regional Options tab)
3)Go to the tab at the top that says Languages
4)Make sure the box for Install files for East Asian Languages near the bottom is checked
5)Select ‘Details’ under ‘Text Services and Input Languages’
6)Click ‘Add’ on the right-hand side
7)Select Korean for ‘Input Languages’ and click ‘Ok’
8)Select ‘Apply at the bottom, and then click ‘Ok’. You may be asked to restart.

Your computer is now set up to type in Korean. In order to actually type Korean, click the little blue button on the taskbar that says EN. Select KO. The options to the right should change. There should be an A. Click that once, and it will change to a Korean character. Type 🙂

Windows 95, 98, 2000

Your computer will need to download an additional file from microsoft in order to type Korean. It is not a virus and will not cause any problems for your computer. It is directly from Microsoft.

Click here to be taken directly to Microsoft download page

1)Follow the instructions Microsoft offers to download the file from the link above. Be sure to select Korean with Language Pack from the list.
2) Once restarted, you can go to Start – Programs and there will be a new icon for Microsoft Global IME. In it there is a brief help file you can read over.
3) When you have something open that you can write Korean in (such as a browser, word document, etc). There should be a little icon that says EN in the very bottom right of your screen in the taskbar. If you click it, you can select Korean (KO). Once selected, a new small box will pop up nearby.
4) Click the letter A in the new box once, and it should change to Korean characters. Now you can type Korean. Simply click it again to change it back to the roman alphabet, or switch the original box back to english. You’re all set!

Type by .learnkoreanlanguage

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How To View Hangul

If you simply wish to view Hangul, follow these simple steps.
You will be asked to install a language pack. It is not a virus and comes directly from Microsoft. You’re computer will run as it always does. It will simply have the ability to view Korean characters as well.


Sidebar: A visitor informed me that when you follow the instructions below, Windows will ask you to insert the Microsoft Windows CD-ROM. If you do not have one, or if the instructions below do not work for whatever reason (such as you cannot get Korean to appear on the ‘Add’ list), there is an alternative. Go to this Microsoft page and follow the instructions. This will also install the Korean language support files.


Open your internet browser, and go to a page with Korean characters on it (makes it easier to see when it is working);

Internet Explorer
Netscape
Mozilla Firefox
Linux Users
If you have still have trouble after following the instructions, click here.

Internet Explorer

Select ‘View’ From the top menu. Scroll down to ‘Encoding’. Go to the option that says ‘More’. Select Korean from the list. A box will pop up saying you need to install the Korean language pack. Click install. It will install automatically. You may need to restart your computer when finished.

You’re computer should be able to view Hangul, the Korean alphabet now. If you go to a webpage and the characters still do not show up correctly, return to ‘View – Encoding – More – Korean’ to select Korean. You will not be asked to install anything. This will simply make sure that the Korean encoding is turned on and the characters show up properly.

Netscape

Select ‘View’ From the top menu. Scroll down to ‘Character Set’. Select Korean from the list. A box will pop up saying you need to install the Korean language pack. Click install. It will install automatically. You may need to restart your computer when finished.

You’re computer should be able to view Hangul, the Korean alphabet now. If you go to a webpage and the characters still do not show up correctly, return to ‘View – Character Set – Korean’ to select Korean. You will not be asked to install anything. This will simply make sure that the Korean encoding is turned on and the characters show up properly.

Mozilla Firefox

Select ‘View’ From the top menu. Scroll down to ‘Character Encodings’. Go to the option that says ‘More Encodings’. Select ‘East Asian’ from that list. Select Korean (ISO-2022-KR) from the list.

A box may pop up saying you need to install the Korean language pack. Click install. It will install automatically. You may need to restart your computer when finished.


Sidebar: A visitor informed me that with firefox, you may need to follow the instructions for Internet Explorer first to install the Korean language support files. If that doesn’t work, follow the instructions in the first sidebar near the top of the page.


Linux Users

Thanks to Lydia, a Linux user who visits this site, we now provide you with information on how to get the characters working with Linux. I hope it helps! Quote:

“For Debian you just need to apt-get the font package “ttf-baekmuk”. For this
and other distributions, there are very good explanations on the following
Wikipedia page:
East Asian Characters

The wiki page is extremely useful. Check it out!


You’re computer should be able to view Hangul, the Korean alphabet now. If you go to a webpage and the characters still do not show up correctly, return to ‘View – Character Encoding – More Encodings – Korean (ISO-2022-KR)’ to select Korean. You will not be asked to install anything. This will simply make sure that the Korean encoding is turned on and the characters show up properly.

Trouble?

First, check out the following useful links. The first is a wiki page that contains information on installing East Asian Language Fonts on all different kinds of OS (Windows, Mac, Linux). The second is a Microsoft page that provides Windows users step by step instructions (with pictures of every step) for installing and setting up your computer to fully work with Asian fonts (typing the fonts as well).

Wiki Page – East Asian Languages

Microsoft Step-by-Step With Pictures

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